walkydeads:

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

And no lie literally EVERYTHING in Beaufort is named after him.

I had never heard of Robert Smalls until now. That’s clearly a glaring flaw in our U.S. History education. What an wonderful man.

walkydeads:

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

And no lie literally EVERYTHING in Beaufort is named after him.

I had never heard of Robert Smalls until now. That’s clearly a glaring flaw in our U.S. History education. What an wonderful man.

steverogersorbust:

LET’S DO SOMETHING FOR ANTHONY MACKIE.

But instead of a book or a video or something that he might not see (because I honestly suspect he doesn’t much look at Twitter, and we KNOW he has no use for Tumblr or Instagram) maybe we could do something in his name?

I propose setting up a fund to donate in honor of Anthony to the NOCCA Institute, the community support and advocacy arm of NOCCA, where Anthony went to school in New Orleans. It’d be funding a good cause AND it would be something more meaningful and long-term effective than messages and such.

There’s no reason we can’t do BOTH, of course, but I’m curious—if you’re interested in donating to the ANTHONY MACKIE BIRTHDAY CHARITY FUNDRAISER please reblog. If I see enough interest, I’ll set up the deets, and post something by beginning of next week that organizes how we might donate as a unified front in Anthony’s name!

steampunkgasoline:

(x)

Fly, my pretty! FLY!

nubbsgalore:

jim and jamie dutcher, determined to show “the hidden life of wolves”, lived for six years with a pack of wolves in the idaho wilderness of yellowstone. a constant but unobtrusive presence, the dutchers earned the unshakable trust of the wolves, and came to know them as complex, highly intelligent animals with distinct individual personalities, who are caring, playful and above all devoted to family.

"only a select few other species exhibit these same traits so clearly," they note. "they are capable of not only emotion but also real compassion. this is the view of the wolf that we want to share. …it is an animal that cares for its sick and desperately needs to be part of something bigger than itself - the pack. the bond a wolf has to its pack is certainly as strong as the bond a human being has to his or her family."

they add, “rarely did two wolves pass each other without playfully rubbing shoulders together or exchanging a brief lick. so often we would see two wolves relaxing together, curled up beside each other.” the dutchers also recount wolf behavior rarely documented: grief at the death of a pack mate; excitement over the birth of pups; and the shared role of raising young pack members.

but as the wolves struggle to reestablish their foothold in the american west, their public demonization continues.  say the dutchers, “as we see wolves, once again, being shot, trapped and poisoned, we recognize that our unique experience, living with wolves, is unlikely to ever happen again, and for that reason we feel that we have an obligation to share the lives of these wolves we with the widest audience possible.”

it’s not just the wolves at stake, but the entire yellowstone ecosystem. wolves keep the elk gene pool strong (no other predator does this); they redistribute elk herds, allowing vegetation to recover along rivers and streams, which provides food for beavers; and they keep the number of coyotes in check, which helps to maintain populations of rodents, antelopes and birds of prey. 

I love wolves, so much.

221books:

cornflakepizza:

winchesterbr0s:

hesmybrother-hesadopted:

beesmygod:

“chuffed doesnt mean what you think it means”

image

it means exactly what i think it means its just some stupid word that literally has two definitions that mean the opposite thing

This makes me really chuffed.

This post is quite egregious

image

Well I’m nonplussed by this whole post.

image

image

Oh gods so true. (Though I’m re-learning French at this point, and all I can say is that I’m SO VERY GRATEFUL English does not have gendered nouns. Gendered nouns are of the devil.)

prrb:

please turn on the audio for this

BABY GOAT. SO CUTE.

huffingtonpost:

Jon Stewart’s Priceless Response To Fox News On Ferguson

Jon Stewart is back from vacation, and he’s not wasting any time going after one of his favorite targets: Fox News.

Watch his the full brilliant 10  minute monologue on racism and Ferguson  here. 

Jon Stewart nailed it last night.

Mr. Elba for your dash.

(Sidenote: he got robbed last night at the Emmys. Blah blah Breaking Bad aka Two White Dudes Making Dealing Meth Seem Cool.)

(Source: imustveblinked)

badbilliejean:

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: Portraits by photographer Jalani Morgan.

It’s always strange and a bit surreal to me when I look at a photograph of strangers and somehow manage to feel as though the person behind the lens has so aptly managed to capture the essence of those pictured. Perhaps it’s a bit of romanticism on my part, but I can’t help but feel that way when looking at the work of photographer Jalani Morgan. What may on the surface seem to be a simple portrait becomes an intensifying three-way relationship between the subject, the photographer and viewer.  A two-dimensional image is brought to life and in a matter of seconds, upon gazing at Morgan’s portraits, I have no option but to feel a close connection to the unknown faces captured by his lens.

Jalani Morgan is a portrait, fine art and documentary photographer. 

Born in Toronto, Ontario, and raised in Scarborough. He was influenced by his parents’ teachings of the African Diasporas and politics and through that is interjected into his art. 

He produces work that investigates the representation from the African diaspora.

Currently he is studying at York University in Toronto obtaining his degree in Anthropology and African Studies.

This >

Fantastic.

In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’