maakomori:

did i really see someone call fan bingbing “one of the rising actresses of colour in mainstream media”

  1. fan bingbing is not a woman of colour the way chinese american women are women of colour. that that straight. she is a mandarin speaking han chinese woman in a country where standard mandarin is the prestige dialect and han chinese are the vast majority of the population. she is also obscenely wealthy. aside from her being a woman, she is the opposite of oppressed let’s be real. yes, she is a woman from a country that is considered to be part of the global south~ and the third world~ but she is not a woman of colour. woc/poc is a political identity. is she politicised and racialised in a country where she is part of the ethnicity that is 1) upheld as the norm 2) holds pr much all of the social political and economic wealth?
  2. she is not a “rising” actress. she has literally been acting since 1998, since she was jinsuo in hzgg, nor is she just getting established in mainstream media. she has LITERALLY been /THE/ highest paid actor, male or female, in the chinese entertainment industry several years in a row. she’s started her own production company and has enough money to fund her own projects. she pretty much IS the mainstream. the reason no one has seen much of her work in the west is because frankly the west doesn’t care about chinese media. not because she isn’t mainstream.

As someone who’s lived right next to Chinatown for the past 10 years, I’ve seen Ms. Bingbing’s face more than I have, say, ScarJo’s. She’s everywhere.

t-ardigrades:

wigmund:

pinkrocksugar:

stunningpicture:

LOOK AT ITS BIG FOOTERS

IMAGINE THE TOE BEANS ON THIS BABBY

(main image source)
Lynx footsies are mostly floof


He can’t have too much bean, he lives in the chilly zone. He’ll get cold beanies and that’s no good.

The amount of high-pitched squeeing my brain is currently doing at these pictures is astonishing. Also, best use of my “animals” tag EVER.

t-ardigrades:

wigmund:

pinkrocksugar:

stunningpicture:

LOOK AT ITS BIG FOOTERS

IMAGINE THE TOE BEANS ON THIS BABBY

(main image source)

Lynx footsies are mostly floof

image

He can’t have too much bean, he lives in the chilly zone. He’ll get cold beanies and that’s no good.

The amount of high-pitched squeeing my brain is currently doing at these pictures is astonishing. Also, best use of my “animals” tag EVER.

…[F]eminism also dares to expect more from men. Feminism expects a man to be ethical, emotionally present, and accountable to his values in his actions with women - as well as other men. Feminism loves men enough to expect them to act more honorably and actually believes them capable of doing so. Feminism is a vision that expects men to go from being “just *guys*,” accepting whatever they might happen to do, to being *just* guys - capable of autonomy and authenticity, inspired by justice. That is, feminism believes guys can become men.

Little Richard being completely serious (x)

You go, Little Richard. 

(Source: bitchcraftandwiggatry)

Holiday weekend snack goodness

Holiday weekend snack goodness

The trend of labeling women “crazy” is part of the culture that socializes women to go along to get along. When women are told over and over again that they’re not allowed to feel the way they feel and that they’re being “unreasonable” or “oversensitive”, they’re conditioned to not trust their own emotions. Their behavior – being assertive, even demanding or standing up for how they feel – becomes an “inconvenience” to men and they’re taught not to give offense and to consider the feelings of others before their own.
walkydeads:

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

And no lie literally EVERYTHING in Beaufort is named after him.

I had never heard of Robert Smalls until now. That’s clearly a glaring flaw in our U.S. History education. What an wonderful man.

walkydeads:

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

And no lie literally EVERYTHING in Beaufort is named after him.

I had never heard of Robert Smalls until now. That’s clearly a glaring flaw in our U.S. History education. What an wonderful man.

steverogersorbust:

LET’S DO SOMETHING FOR ANTHONY MACKIE.

But instead of a book or a video or something that he might not see (because I honestly suspect he doesn’t much look at Twitter, and we KNOW he has no use for Tumblr or Instagram) maybe we could do something in his name?

I propose setting up a fund to donate in honor of Anthony to the NOCCA Institute, the community support and advocacy arm of NOCCA, where Anthony went to school in New Orleans. It’d be funding a good cause AND it would be something more meaningful and long-term effective than messages and such.

There’s no reason we can’t do BOTH, of course, but I’m curious—if you’re interested in donating to the ANTHONY MACKIE BIRTHDAY CHARITY FUNDRAISER please reblog. If I see enough interest, I’ll set up the deets, and post something by beginning of next week that organizes how we might donate as a unified front in Anthony’s name!

steampunkgasoline:

(x)

Fly, my pretty! FLY!